The Dorothy Parkes Centre has received an SCVO Vision 2030 Community Mental Health grant which will enable us to provide free support programmes for members of our local community who have had experience of grief, bereavement, and loss.

 

We will deliver eight-week support programmes and they will take place at Dorothy Parkes Centre. We will deliver ten courses in total which can each accommodate 6-8 people. The programmes will be delivered at various times throughout the week, i.e., mornings/afternoons/evenings, over a twelve-month period.

 

The programme is in partnership with Smethwick Old Church and compounds taught elements with creative activities, scenarios, & space for the participants to share their stories. The essence of the programme is to allow people to explore the taboo of loss and the subsequent debts of grief that emerges when you have lost someone. It is an initiative which is community led, delivered with compassion, and understanding, whilst being evaluated using NHS guidelines on emotional health and well-being, individual resilience, and Cognitive Behaviour Therapy mindfulness.  By its very nature, our programme will have core elements, but individuals participating on the course will find the sessions flexible enough to create a safe space in which to talk openly about the issues that they face both historically and currently. The purpose of the course is preventative and the aim is to accommodate the needs of the individual at the point of access. A listening ear, a cup of tea and a biscuit, as well as companionship as people navigate their way through life altering changes over which we have no control.

 

To register your interest in this programme please complete the Enquiry Form.

Testimonial

  

"I was really worried about attending the Loss Matters programme because I felt that I hadn’t grieved for my husband as I had been looking after my daughter who had a bad accident.  So, when she moved into her own place and was settled that was when I felt it most.  I used to sit and cry on a night-time when I was on my own, so going somewhere to talk about it frightened me.

 

First night I sat there and began to cry before anyone spoke to me, but as the weeks went by, I opened up and talked more about him.  It helped having other people there going through the same thing and you didn’t feel awkward. 

 

The volunteer facilitators were lovely and showed me there are different ways people grieve, not everyone is the same.  I feel I am a strong person and they told me that it wasn’t wrong to go out by myself and not worry what I think people are saying about me.  There is no one way to grieve."